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Month: November 2010

A VOLUNTARY Program to Make the Good Guys Pay for the Bad Guys

A VOLUNTARY Program to Make the Good Guys Pay for the Bad Guys

Why should the good guys be made to pay for the mistakes of the bad guys?  Maybe we should just walk away. Case in point.  US big box retailers put a bunch of US manufacturers out of business in the 80's and 90's when they pressed for price concessions that made it unprofitable to deliver out of US factories.  Now, the same retailers are having product quality problems and they expect US manufacturers to pay for a fix.  What's the fix?  Implementing Read more [...]
DOE Rulemakings, With Savings in Mind

DOE Rulemakings, With Savings in Mind

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 established an energy conservation program for major household appliances.  Since then, various amendments to EPCA have given DOE the authority to regulate the energy efficiency of various technologies, to include appliances and lighting technologies. The purpose of these rulemakings is to establish energy conservation standards and test procedures for technologies that are feasible, economically justified, and result in energy savings.  Read more [...]
Some Good News at Last

Some Good News at Last

After several months of less-than-stellar readings on the U.S. economy, including last week’s lackluster print on Q3 GDP, a few positive data points released this week offer at least some hope for optimism going forward. Both the ISM manufacturing and non-manufacturing indexes registered gains compared to the previous month and some of the key components of each index (new orders, production, exports, etc.), suggest conditions in the economy-at-large are improving, albeit at a slow pace. Today’s Read more [...]
The Day After…and the Next Two Years

The Day After…and the Next Two Years

Election Day 2010 is (mostly) behind us - looking in the rearview mirror, here is what we now know: The Numbers: Republicans will control the U.S. House of Representatives in the 112th Congress, achieving a net gain of 60+ seats (8 races still uncalled). Democrats will retain control of the U.S. Senate, albeit it by slimmer margins - Republicans gained at least 6 seats (2 remain uncalled), falling short of the 10 needed to take control. There will be over a hundred new faces in the Read more [...]