Benchmarking and Transparency Work

Benchmarking and Transparency Work

This piece was originally published in the November 2016 issue of electroindustry.

Patrick Hughes, Senior Director, Government Relations and Strategic Initiatives, NEMA

Patrick Hughes of NEMA calls on state energy officials to adopt building energy benchmarking and transparency policies.
Patrick Hughes of NEMA calls on state energy officials to adopt building energy benchmarking and transparency policies.

At the annual meeting of the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in Providence, Rhode Island, NEMA presented the results of its recent survey of New York City facility mangers.

The survey found that building owners and managers are making operational changes and capital expenditures to improve the energy performance of their buildings in response to New York City’s energy benchmarking and transparency ordinance, Local Law 84. Of those surveyed, 77 percent had made a low- or no-cost operation change, and 75 percent spent money to upgrade building systems to save energy, including lighting, lighting controls, heating and cooling systems, building energy management systems, and more.

New York City passed its benchmarking policy in 2009. The city reported an 11 percent drop in energy use intensity (EUI) in commercial buildings and a five percent drop for multifamily building EUI from 2010 to 2013 (New York City’s Energy and Water Use 2013 Report).

Speaking on behalf of NEMA, Patrick Hughes, senior director, government relations and strategic initiatives, called on officials to adopt municipal, county, and state building energy benchmarking and transparency policies as a way to save energy and support construction and manufacturing jobs.

Read the November 2016 issue of electroindustry.

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