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Understanding CFLs Better

Compact fluorescent lamps -- CFLs -- are in the news all the time now. Most of the time for the better, as with USA Today's special Earth Day spread announcing that the three top lightbulb makers (NEMA members GE, Osram Sylvania, and Philips) are introducing new CFLs that appear and act more like traditional incandescent bulbs. But sometimes with mixed reviews, like the recent MSNBC piece addressing CFL mercury concerns.

With conflicting information out there, NEMA decided to place a FAQ sheet about CFLs on its website. Visit the site and you'll learn that a typical CFL has 5 mg of mercury, barely enough to cover the tip of a ballpoint pen. And that reductions in mercury emissions from reduced power generation far outweigh mercury emissions from any type of lamp disposal activity. And that you can learn more about recycling bulbs at www.lamprecycle.org.


Posted 04-22-2008 7:44 PM by Stephen Gold
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Comments

NEMA Currents wrote A New Lighting Index Shows CFLs Shining Bright
on 05-15-2008 2:13 PM

Considering NEMA's role in lighting systems -- we represent the largest lighting companies in North

shredding Dallas wrote re: Understanding CFLs Better
on 04-22-2011 6:03 AM

Paper, plastic, metal are some of the products that we can recycle these days to minimize the abuse of our natural resources. New products keep on getting manufactured because of their high demand from consumers and this poses a threat to the supply of our resources such as trees. Aside from that, we should also think about the proper disposal of used CFL bulbs. We cannot simply throw in the trash for this can be hazardous. Proper disposal of paper documents, palstic credit cards, hard drives and now CFL bulbs should be widespread so that more people will come to understand.

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