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"Wireless Waves Harmless" - 1909 Marconi Statement

As noted in the article titled the same as this post, noted scientists, inventors and engineers have come to the same conclusion - that Electromagnetic Fields are safe.  Given the ability of microwave emissions from high power radar to fry something in its path, that is not always absolutely true but the article - "The Conceits of Setting EMF Standards: Australia To Triple Its Limit to 3,000mG" posted on June 11, 2009 by Microwave News - seems to be inflammatory and not useful for the continued growth and advancement of electrical and electronic industry. 

 There has been significant experimentation and literature published on the issue but no conclusions that any health risks are evident beyond those of common sense - don't put any living creature in the microwave.  International standards have been published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety, and by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection under sponsorship of the World Health Organization.  Even the WHO has come to the conclusion, on its web page considering health effects of EMF Key Point #6, that "Despite extensive research, to date there is no evidence to conclude that exposure to low level electromagnetic fields is harmful to human health."  Note that the typical hair dryer, at a distance of just over an inch away, has approximately 60 to 20,000 mG according to the WHO site.  

 So what purpose does the Microwave News article serve, given the public availability of copious quantities of EMF information, and the multiple academic investigations and epidemiological studies?  I will leave it for others to draw their own conclusions.


Posted 06-12-2009 3:33 PM by Gettman, Kenneth
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